• Images taken over forty years ago are reanimated in Bill Henson’s mysteriously beckoning new monograph – Particle Mist. Drawn from three series: Untitled 1974, Untitled 1975, with additional and previously unseen photographs from an unfinished work begun in 1976, they are ostensibly of young dancers – girls in ballet class. Arranged in three acts that reference classical narrative ballet form, we see the girls in Act 1, in their boaters and blazers, in pairs or alone. They aren’t speaking, just outdoors and waiting, perhaps for an exam or class or for something to stir them from their private thoughts. Act II – and the girls are in the penumbra of an old-fashioned, high-windowed studio, hair demurely secured in white hairbands, wearing regulation leotards. They don’t converse; they stretch, lean against the barre, [...]

  • The latest project from renowned writer and curator David Campany is his most unusual to date. It is a history of dust. Or rather, a history of the last century told from the perspective of dust photographed. As his exhibition opens at Le Bal in Paris, and the experimental book of the project is published by MACK, Campany talks with Rose Radnitzky.  Rose Radnitzky: Why dust?David Campany: So many reasons. Dust is the enemy of the modern faith in cleanliness and systems. Dust is the inevitable evidence of the world’s attrition and decay. Nothing lasts forever. Every time I see dust that is what I find myself thinking. We make our way, we struggle to organise our short time here, trying to make it better, and that’s a [...]

  •                    In a carefully crafted short essay entitled “Time’s Fossil”, first published in 1984, Daido Moriyama recounts chancing upon an old photograph on the wall of a little-visited provincial museum on the island of Hokkaido, the most northerly of the Japanese archipelago, sometime in the mid 1970s. For Moriyama, the occasion proved to be foundational, and he describes the encounter as “an experience […] like none other I have ever had”. The faded image, ostensibly of an Ainu village (the indigenous people of the region), may well once have been of documentary use in an anthropological context, but had long since degenerated through exposure to light, to the extent that any specificities were so suffused as to be difficult to delineate. Close [...]

  • With an acclaimed background in commercial and advertising photography for major brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Armani, Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, Guido Mocafico has also become renowned for his personal projects. Utilising his masterful skills as a still life photographer, these personal projects pay homage to the still life tradition and heritage that is probably most associated with European painting. There is no surprise then that the Swiss-born Italian Mocafico, who lives in Paris, has something of a pan-European appreciation for the classic genre and it is appropriately so that he has found a subject in Blaschka, his latest exhibition on display at Hamiltons Gallery, London, until May 24th.Originally from Bohemia, but based in Dresden, Leopold (1822-1895) and Rudolf (1857-1939) Blaschka were master glassmakers who used a combination of clear, [...]
  • Canon’s PIXMA Pro range of desktop sheet-fed photo printers, the PRO-10S, PRO-100S and flagship PRO-1 make it easy for serious photographers to choose from by sharing a number of common features for superior colour and mono prints. Each model adopts Canon’s proprietary FINE print head technology and advanced imaging processing and the same colour conversion engine, delivering stunning quality prints ranging in size from 10x15cm (6x4-inches) to A3+, and offer support for heavyweight media up to 14-inches wide using the manual feeder with exceptional productivity. Canon’s Optimum Image Generating (OIG) system analyses the photo colour and precisely calculates the optimum ink combination and volume of ink droplets, which are then accurately placed on the paper by Canon’s FINE print head with 12,288 nozzles.The top-of the-range PRO-1, for example, can deliver a [...]
  • As Derek Ridgers new book The Others published by Idea, begins to be slotted neatly into book shelves across the world, we caught up with the British photographer to find out more. Gregory Barker: How did you first become interested in photography. Derek Ridgers: I think I’ve always been interested in photography but I wasn’t at all interested in taking photographs myself when I was young.  I went to art school when I was 16 and there was a photography department and photography lessons but I didn’t listen and didn’t care.  I wanted to be a painter and was focused entirely on that.  But I used tear out photos of things that interested me and keep them, right from my early teens.  Like most heterosexual young men, there were lots of photographs of [...]